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CLUTCH PROBLEM!!! BIG PROBLEM!

This is a clutch gone completely WRONG and something you want to be very sure doesn't happen with your vehicle!  VERY SURE! 

So how do you ensure you are not having an issue with your clutch when most drivers simply get in and drive?  What do you look for?  That is a question many of our customers ask us here at Jamie's Auto Repair in Titusville and one this driver did not.

Most clutches are not an issue and when they start becoming an issue they give you signs that there is a problem that are relatively simple looking back on them to see. 

Slipping. Failing clutches are often said to be "slipping," which is exactly the sensation drivers report. The clutch may feel as though it is not fully disengaging or engaging (if the clutch is failing, this is likely accurate).  It is most noticeable when the engine is under a heavy load, like when you go to pass another vehicle, traveling uphill or pulling a trailer. As your clutch slips, it overheats and causes wear; it also makes the problem worse causing more damage so you should see this issue of "slipping" more often. 

Noisy & Jerky.  While all clutches will wear down, if the clutch is noisy and jerky it will indicate failure.  It may be from a leaking seal on the crankshaft, the transmission shaft or even engine oil could be an issue which causes it to grab unevenly "jerking" the clutch to cause it to slip when under a heavy load.   

Foul Smell or Burning Smell.  When the clutch gets too hot and overheated it will burn giving off this odd odor and if it doesn't have the chance to cool down you will ruin the flywheel and/or the pressure plate.  Once the clutch disc has been worn beyond a certain point, the clutch may begin to slip very noticeably.

Master and Slave Cylinders. Sometimes clutch-related problems can actually be the clutch linkage (or other parts) rather than the clutch itself. Many newer automobiles feature master and slave cylinders with internal pistons with seals that can develop leaks; this may result in the clutch failing to disengage fully or even causing it to engage prematurely. Slave cylinders are more likely to leak and are more likely to see fluid collect and leak through the seals.

How to Diagnose a Slipping Clutch in Your Car

Be aware of your clutch's action. Although a clutch/pressure plate system wears gradually over time, eventually the clutch's performance may become noticeably diminished, and by paying close attention to how it engages, slippage should be apparent to a competent driver. Here are some simple signs to watch for:

  • Change in engine speed without noticeable acceleration. If you rev your engine and the car hesitates before accelerating, it can mean your clutch isn't delivering the boost in RPM through the transmission to the drive wheels.
  • Change in the clutch pedal height where the driver feels the clutch begin to engage.
  • Change in perceived engine power when pulling a load. A slipping clutch reduces the amount of power delivered to the drive wheels.

Notice if you smell something burning coming from under the hood. This may be the result of an oil leak or even damaged electrical wiring (both serious, but not clutch-related issues), but it can also be a sign of a slipping clutch.

Push down on the clutch pedal. Your clutch may need to be replaced if it takes only a little of the pedal movement to disengage it. There should be an inch or two (2 to 4 cm) of free movement of the pedal before the clutch starts to disengage. If it disengages sooner, this is an indicator that your clutch is not riding (i.e., is not partially disengaged) when the pedal is not depressed.

Check to fluid level.  Check the clutch fluid reservoir, which is located near the brake master cylinder. The reservoir should either be filled to the top, or somewhere between the minimum and maximum lines shown on the reservoir. If necessary, add fluid to the reservoir.

  • Some vehicles use the brake master cylinder for the clutch. If this is the case, make sure there is brake fluid in the master cylinder.
Check the clutch fluid reservoir, which is located near the brake master cylinder. The reservoir should either be filled to the top, or somewhere between the minimum and maximum lines shown on the reservoir. If necessary, add fluid to the reservoir.
  • Some vehicles use the brake master cylinder for the clutch. If this is the case, make sure there is brake fluid in the master cylinder.

Take the car for a drive. See if it takes more RPMs from the engine to achieve a certain speed. This can also be an indicator your car needs a clutch replacement.

  • While driving down the road in 3rd gear, put the car in 2nd gear, then let out the clutch. If the RPMs of the engine don't immediately go up, it may be time to replace the clutch.
  • Another way to establish if your clutch needs repair is to test it in a parking lot. Drive with the car in 3rd or 4th gear and, with your foot still on the accelerator, push the clutch in and release it. It should immediately come down in RPM. If the RPMs do not come down when you release, that means your clutch is worn out and slipping.

If you have any questions about your clutch, transmission or anything else on your car, truck, suv or classic vehicle simply come by and talk to our team of professional automotive and truck mechanics here at Jamie's Auto Repair in Titusville

 



Thank you for visiting Jamie's Auto Repair located at 380 Elaine Drive in Titusville Florida. Count on our automotive repair technicians to keep your car, truck, suv, or van on the roads longer and safer. Schedule your appointment today (321) 607-6815 or schedule online.

Jamie's Auto Repair

380 Elaine Dr
Titusville Florida   32796

location small (321) 607-6815
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Open Weekdays:   8:30am - 5:30pm
 Weekends: Closed

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